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Welcome

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Welcome

In 2020, Netsafe reported that online scams cost Kiwis $11.6 million. Scammers are becoming increasingly clever and sophisticated. This is why it’s so important for the community to learn how to identify and avoid scams so that we can protect ourselves and the people we care about.  

How To Avoid Scams:

  • Update your settings to private on Facebook and Instagram so that content you post can only be seen by people you know.
  • Use the Facebook Security Check Up and Instagram Security Check Up guides to find out how to set up a strong password, two factor authentication, and login alerts
  • If you’re unsure about a message you’ve received, don’t open it.
  • Facebook will never ask you for your password in an email or a Messenger message, or send you a password as an attachment. If an email or message claiming it’s from Facebook looks strange, don't open it or any attachments. Instead, report it by forwarding it to: phish@fb.com 
  • If you think your Facebook or Instagram account has been hacked, you can resolve this yourself by following the steps in the Facebook Hacked Wizard and Instagram Hacked Wizard
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately. 
  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

 

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Romance

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Romance

Romance scams are unfortunately common. Typically, the scammer will contact someone and claim to be looking for love or friendship. Once they have built trust, they slowly escalate and begin asking for money or other favours. It’s important to remember that these scammers spend a lot of time and energy to build up an online relationship that can seem very deep and real.

Steps You Can Take:

  • Be cautious about who you communicate with online and don’t accept friend requests from people you do not personally know.
  • Never send personal details or money to someone you don’t know.
  • If you receive a message from someone you don’t know, you can use the blocking feature on Facebook and Instagram.
  • If you’re suspicious about a new contact, consider trying reverse image search.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.
  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Prizes & Promotion

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Prizes & Promotion

Prize and promotion scammers typically claim that you have won a prize or fantastic deal and ask for payment to cover shipping or other costs, and/or your personal details to redeem the offer. But then it turns out that these prizes or deals don’t actually exist.

Steps You Can Take:

  • Always research who you’re dealing with - a quick search about the offer or company can save you clicking on potentially harmful links.
  • Never send money or share personal information to someone you don’t know.
  • Try calling the company using a number from their official website.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.
  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Online Shopping

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Online Shopping

There are many benefits to shopping online, particularly with so many genuine sites now available. But we also need to be aware that there’s a range of online shopping scams. The most common scams either claim to sell products that they don’t have, or sell poor quality products at top quality prices. The scammers may even steal a real company’s marketing images, making it difficult to tell them apart.

Steps You Can Take:

  • Always use a trusted online retailer, or research a seller before you buy.
  • Check the reviews of online sellers to see what previous customers have said.  
  • Buy online using a credit card with a low spend limit, or a well-respected payment service such as PayPal. Buying with a credit card gives you better protection than a debit card.
  • Look for a padlock symbol in the browser window when you browse, log in, register and check out.
  • Only enter your credit/debit card details on a webpage that begins with ‘https://’. The ‘s’ stands for secure and means your payment information is encrypted.
  • Check that the URL of the website matches what they’re selling.
  • On Facebook Marketplace:
    • Check if the Facebook profile appears new or incomplete, as this could be a sign that the account has been set up for scamming.
    • Insist on meeting to conduct transactions and examine the item before completing the transaction.
    • Meet in a public place, and take a friend.
    • Do not go into someone's house or allow them into yours.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.
  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Phishing

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Phishing

Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick a large number of people to share their personal information (like bank account numbers and passwords), so that they can then use it to impersonate or defraud people. These messages can look very real, and some will even use the branding or logo of a legitimate organisation to make the message look genuine.

Steps You Can Take:

  • Always check emails or other online messages that ask you to update or verify your details, or try to force you to act quickly e.g. by threatening you with legal action or loss of an account.
  • If you’re unsure if a message is legitimate, look into who you’re dealing with.
  • Remember that legitimate organisations will never ask you to send them your password.
  • If you’re unsure if a message is from a legitimate organisation, you can contact them to ask. Make sure you go through their official contact channels – don’t use the links, phone numbers, websites or email addresses provided in the message.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.
  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Impersonation

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Impersonation

Scammers may try to win your trust by impersonating a friend or family member, a celebrity or organisation that you know to try and convince you of their story. This can result in them tricking you into sending them money or sharing your personal details.

Steps You Can Take:

  • Don’t respond if you receive a request or message from someone who you don’t know.
  • If you get a suspicious message from someone you know, let them know through another means and suggest that they reset their passwords across the apps they are using. 
  • You may wish to use the blocking feature on Facebook and Instagram.
  • Manage the privacy settings on all your social media accounts.
  • Avoid sharing personal details on your profiles that you do not wish to be copied.
  • If you think any of your accounts may have been impersonated, consider sharing a warning from your account with your friends and family and advise them not to engage with the fake account.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.

  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

Investment

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Investment

Investment scams are becoming increasingly common and sophisticated in response to the growing interest in purchasing shares and cryptocurrencies, and accessibility of online investing. Investment scammers typically try to steal larger amounts of money by tricking people into thinking they’re investing in quick and easy ways to grow their wealth.

Steps You Can Take:

  • When considering investing online, ensure that you are working with a genuine and credible organisation, including by checking their website and any online reviews.
  • Be cautious of offers that seem secretive, promise significant or fast returns, or try to rush you into making a quick investment.
  • Report all scams or suspicious messages immediately.

  • Download tips in te reo Māori on how you and your whānau can avoid scams here.

A campaign by

  • Facebook
  • Netsafe
  • NZ Police
  • Certnz

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